Additions & Corrections

  1. Virgil the Poet

    1. Virgil on Himself

      1. Georgics

      2. Letter to Augustus

    2. Contemporary Response

      1. Lucius Varius Rufus

      2. Horace

      3. Agrippa

      4. Porpertius

      5. Domitius Marsus

    3. Later Influence and Importance

      1. Ovid

        • Lowe, Dunstan M. Personification Allegory in the Aeneid and Ovid's Metamorphoses. Mnemosyne 61 (2008), 414–435.
        • Marpicati, Paolo. Gli Argumenta Aeneidos pseudo-ovidiani (AL 1–2 Shackleton Bailey): un esempio di paratestualità didattica. 1 and 2. Schol(i)a 1, no. 2 (1999) 119–131 and 2, no. 1 (2000) 147–164.
      2. Ille ego qui quondam gracili modulatus avena

      3. Appendix Vergiliana

        • For a recent collection of essays, see:
          Holzberg, Niklas, ed. Die Appendix Vergiliana: Pseudepigraphen im literarischen Kontext. Classica Monacensia 30. Tübingen: Narr, 2005.
      4. Seneca the Elder

      5. Velleius Paterculus

      6. Quintus Remmius Palaemon

      7. Seneca the Younger

      8. Pliny the Elder

        • Doody, Aude. Virgil the Farmer? Critiques of the Georgics in Columella and Pliny. Classical Philology 102 (2007), 180–197.
      9. Lucan

        • For recent articles on Lucan's relationship with Virgil, see:
          Nagyllé, J. Vergil-Allusionen bei Lucan. Acta Antiqua Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae 46 (2006), 383–420.Roux, Nathaëlle. The Vergilian Tradition in Lucan's Representation of Italy. Vergilius 54 (2008), 37–48.
      10. Calpurnius Siculus

      11. First Einsiedeln Eclogue

      12. Laus Pisonis

      13. Petronius

      14. Columella

        • Dumont, Jean Christian. Columella and Vergil. Vergilius 54 (2008), 49–58.
      15. Pompeian Graffiti

      16. Masada Papyrus

      17. Vindolanda Writing-Tablets

        • An inscription that probably comes from Aeneid 1.313 (bina manu l…) has also been found painted on wall-plaster at Otford. See M. Henig, The Art of Roman Britain (London, 1994), 119.
        • The Virgilian tag conticuere omnes (Aeneid 2.1) appears in a graffito on a flue-tile now in the Reading Museum, from the Roman site of Silchester just south of Reading. The graffito, which is scratched in scratched cursive, may be the remnant of a writing lesson: Pertacus perfidus campester Lucilianus Campanus conticuere omnes. For further information, see F. Haverfield, The Romanization of Roman Britain, 3rd ed. (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1915), 30, and G.C. Boon, Silchester (Newton Abbot, 1974), 64, and fig. 7.4.
      18. Silius Italicus

      19. Quintilian

      20. Martial

      21. Statius

        • Hill, D. S. Statius' Debt to Virgil. Proceedings of the Virgil Society 26 (2008), 52–65.
      22. Tacitus

      23. Florus

      24. Pliny the Younger

      25. Juvenal

      26. Apuleius

      27. Aulus Gellius

        • Mantelli, Francesco. Interpretazioni Virgiliane a confronto: Cesellio Vindice e Sulpicio Apollinare in Gellio II 16 (a proposito di Aen. VI 760–766). Maia 60 (2008), 80–86.
      28. Avienus

      29. Ammianus Marcellinus

        • O'Brien, Peter Ammianus Epicus: Virgilian Allusion in the Res Gestae. Phoenix 60 (2006), 274–303.
        • O'Brien, Peter An Unnoticed Reminiscence of Aeneid 10.517–20 at Ammianus Marcellinus 22.12.6. Mnemosyne 60 (2007), 662–668.
      30. Jerome

        • Mohr, Ann. Jerome, Virgil, and the Captive Maiden: The Attitude of Jerome to Classical Literature. In J. H. D. Scourfield, ed. Texts and Culture in Late Antiquity: Inheritance, Authority, and Change. Swansea: Classical Press of Wales, 2007. 299–322.
      31. Augustine

      32. Claudian

        • Wheeler, Stephen. More Roman than the Romans of Rome: Virgilian (Self-)fashioning in Claudian's Panegyric for the Consuls Olybrius and Probinus. In J. H. D. Scourfield, ed. Texts and Culture in Late Antiquity: Inheritance, Authority, and Change. Swansea: Classical Press of Wales, 2007. 97–133.
      33. Sidonius Apollinaris

      34. Ennodius

      35. Cassiodorus

      36. Gregory of Tours

      37. Isidore of Seville

      38. Aldhelm

      39. Alcuin

        • Alcuin, Carmina 18.19, in E. Dümmler, ed. MGH Poetae I (1881), 240:
          (Orpheus aut Linus, nec me Maro vincit in odis [Neither Orpheus nor Linus, nor even Virgil surpasses me in (writing) odes]
      40. Ermoldus Nigellus

      41. Welsh Battle of the Trees

        • For broader information on Virgilian influence on Welsh literature, see:
          Davies, Ceri. Welsh Literature and the Classical Tradition. Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1995.
      42. Ermenrich of Ellwangen

        Two new editions have appeared:
        • Ermenrich d'Ellwangen. Lettre à Grimald. Edited and translated by Monique Goullet. Sources d'histoire médiévale publiées par l'Institut de Recherche et d'Histoire des Textes. Paris: CNRS Éditions, 2008.
          The passages in question are edited and translated on pp. 140–147 and annotated on pp. 213–220.
        • Ermenrico di Ellwangen. Epistola a Grimaldo. Ricerche intermedievali 6. Alessandria: Edizioni dell'Orso, 2009.
      43. Modus Ottinc

      44. Fulbert of Chartres

      45. Donizo

      46. Peter Abelard

      47. Otto of Freising

      48. Archpoet

      49. Walter of Châtillon

      50. Alan of Lille

      51. Chrétien de Troyes

      52. Jacob van Maerlant

      53. Dante

      54. Petrarch

        • Hübner, Wolfgang. Eine Vergil-Interpretation Augustins bei Petrarca. Wiener Studien 120 (2007), 247–256.
        • On the so-called Virgilius Ambrosianus, see:
          Le postille del Virgilio Ambrosiano: Francesco Petrarca. Ed. Marco Baglio, Antonietta Nebuloni Testa, and Marco Petoletti. Studi sul Petrarca 33–34. 2 vols. Padua: Antenore, 2006.
      55. Chaucer

      56. Christine de Pizane

      57. Maffeo Vegio

    4. Virgil as Performed or Declaimed

      • Panayotakis, Costas. Virgil on the Popular Stage. In Edith Hall and Rosie Wyles, ed. New Directions in Ancient Pantomime. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008.
      1. Tacitus

      2. Suetonius

      3. Probus

      4. Lucian

      5. Macrobius

      6. Performances of the Eclogues

        • Panayotakis, Costas. Virgil on the popular stage. In: Edith Hall and Rosie Wyles, editors. New Directions in Ancient Pantomime. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008. 185–97.
      7. Servius

      8. Augustine

      9. Fulgentius

      10. Venantius Fortunatus

      11. Virgil and Musical Notation

  2. Biography: Images of Virgil

    1. Vitae

      1. Vita Suetonii vulgo Donatiana ( VSD )

        • Jocelyn H. D. Vergilius' cacozelus (Donatus, Vita Vergilii 44). In Papers of the Liverpool Latin Seminar, II: Vergil and Roman elegy, medieval Latin poetry and prose, Greek lyric and drama. Ed. by Francis Cairns. ARCA Classical & Medieval Texts, Papers & monographs 3. Liverpool, 1979. Pp. 67–142.
      2. Jerome

      3. Vita Servii

      4. Vita Focae

      5. Vita Philargyrii I

      6. Vita Philargyrii II

      7. Vita Probi

      8. Expositio Donati

      9. Expositio Monacensis I

      10. Expositio Monacensis II

      11. Periochae Bernenses I

      12. Periochae Bernenses II

      13. Periochae Gudianae

      14. Periochae Tegernseenses

      15. Periochae Vaticanae

      16. Vita Aurelianensis

      17. Vita Bernensis I

      18. Vita Bernensis II

      19. Vita Bernensis III

      20. Vita Gudiana I

      21. Vita Gudiana II

      22. Vita Gudiana III

      23. Vita Leidensis

      24. Vita Monachensis I

      25. Vita Monachensis II

      26. Vita Monachensis III

      27. Vita Monachensis IV

      28. Vita Noricensis I

      29. Vita Noricensis II

      30. Vita Parisina II

      31. Vita Vaticana I

      32. Vita Vaticana II

      33. Vita Vossiana

      34. Zono de' Magnalis

      35. Domenico di Bandino

      36. Sicco Polenton I

      37. Donatus auctus

      38. Sicco Polenton II

      39. Vita Laurentiana

        • Stok, Fabio. La Vita Laurentiana di Virgilio. In Studi sulle Vitae Vergilianae. Ed. Giorgio Brugnoli and Fabio Stok. Testi e studi di cultura classica 34. Pisa: ETS, 2006. 115–124.
    2. Virgil's Birthday: Ides of October as Sacred

      1. Pliny the Younger

      2. Martial

      3. Ausonius

    3. Virgil's Remains and Grave

      1. Epitaph

      2. Statius

      3. Martial

      4. Pliny the Younger

      5. Aelius Donatus

      6. Vita Probi

      7. Jerome

      8. Sidonius Apollinaris

      9. Eusthenius

      10. Pompilianus

      11. Radulfus Tortarius

      12. John of salisbury

      13. Conrad of Querfurt

      14. Gervase of Tilbury

      15. Dante

      16. Sequence about St. Paul

        • Ad Maronis mausoleum
          For speculation that the two strophes in the manner of Stabat mater may have been composed by Petrarch himself (since they are attested only in Petrarch's Virgil codex), see:
          Berschin, Walter. Glossierte Virgil-Handschriften dreier aetates Virgilianae. In The Role of the Book in Medieval Culture: Proceedings of the Oxford International Symposium, 26 September–1 October 1982. Bibliologia 3–4. 2 vols. Turnhout: Brepols, 1986. 1:116–121 (note 8).
      17. Petrarch

      18. Itinerary of a Certain Englishman

      19. Boccaccio

    4. The Burning of the Aeneid

      1. Ovid

      2. Pliny the Elder

      3. Gaius Sulpicius Apollinaris

      4. Aulus Gellius

      5. Aelius Donatus

      6. Macrobius

    5. Autograph Manuscripts of Virgil

      1. Pliny the Elder

      2. Quintilian

      3. Aulus Gellius

    6. Virgilian Images

      1. Ancient Textual References to Portraits of Virgil

      2. Late Antique Textual Reference to Portraits of Virgil

      3. Late Antique Virgilian Imagery

        • For further analysis, see:
          Stefanou, Damaris. Darstellungen aus dem Epos und Drama auf kaiserzeitlichen und spätantiken Bodenmosaiken: eine ikonographische und deutungsgeschichtliche Untersuchung. Münster: Aschendorff, 2006. 11–50.
        • For additional information on the influence of Virgil on Greek literature of the imperial period, see:
          Gärtner, Ursula. Quintus Smyrnaeus und die Aeneis: zur Nachwirkung Vergils in der griechischen Literatur der Kaiserzeit. Zetemata 123. Munich, 2005.
      4. Flabellum of Tournus

      5. Virgil on a Wooden Bowl

      6. Illuminated Aeneid

        • For further information, see:
          Heil, Andreas. Christliche Deutung der Eklogen Vergils: die Tityre-Initiale im Codex Klosterneuburg CCl 742. Antike und Abendland 53 (2007), 100–119.
      7. Virgil in Mantua

      8. Virgil and Dante

      9. Virgil and Petrarch

      10. Portraits of Prophetic Virgil and the Sibyl

      11. Virgil as Magician

      12. Virgil in the Basket

      13. Virgilian Imagery in Non-Virgilian Texts

      14. Conclusion

    7. Virgil as Philosopher and Compendium of Knowledge

      1. Seneca the Younger

      2. Macrobius

      3. Servius

      4. (Pseudo-) Bernardus Silverstris

      5. Roman de Thèbes

      6. John of Salisbury

      7. Alexander Neckam

      8. Boccaccio

    8. Virgil as Worthy of Veneration and Divine

      1. Tacitus

      2. Macrobius

      3. Servius

  3. Virgil's Texts and Their Uses

    1. Virgilian Cento

      • On Alcesta, see:
        Salanitro, Giovanni, ed. and tr. Alcesta: cento vergilianus. Multa paucis 1. Acireale (Catania): Bonanno, 2007.
      • On Hippodamia, see:
        Paolucci, Paola, ed. and tr. Il centone virgiliano Hippodamia dell'Anthologia Latina. Bibliotheca Weidmanniana 9. Hildesheim: G. Olms, 2006.
      • Paolucci, Paola. I munuscula del centone virgiliano Hippodamia alla tradizione e al testo di Virgilio. Euphrosyne 35 (2007), 159–176.
      1. Petronius

      2. Hosidius Geta and African Centos

      3. Tertullian

      4. Ausonius

        • On Ausonius, Cento nuptialis, see:
          J. N. Adams, Ausonius Cento nuptialis 101–131, Studi Italiani di Filologia Classica 53 (1981): 199–215.
      5. Proba

        • Bažil, Martin. Centoneschristiani: métamorphoses d'une forme intertextuelle dans la poésie latine chrétienne de l'Antiquité tardive. Collection des études augustiniennes. Série Moyen Age et temps moderns 47. Paris: Institut d'études augustiniennes, 2008. 115–197, 281–313.
        • Corsaro, Francesco. Scene e personnaggi del Cento Vergilianus di Proba nella loro arrière-pensée allusiva. Orpheus 28 (2007), 25–46.
        • McGill, Scott. Virgil, Christianity, and the Cento Probae. In J. H. D. Scourfield, ed. Texts and Culture in Late Antiquity: Inheritance, Authority, and Change. Swansea: Classical Press of Wales, 2007. 173–193.
      6. Pomponius, Versus ad gratiam Domini

        • Bažil, Martin. Centones christiani: métamorphoses d'une forme intertextuelle dans la poésie latine chrétienne de l'Antiquité tardive. Collection des études augustiniennes. Série Moyen Age et temps moderns 47. Paris: Institut d'études augustiniennes, 2008. 204–218, 315–321.
      7. Mavortius, De ecclesia

        • Bažil, Martin. Centones christiani: métamorphoses d'une forme intertextuelle dans la poésie latine chrétienne de l'Antiquité tardive. Collection des études augustiniennes. Série Moyen Age et temps moderns 47. Paris: Institut d'études augustiniennes, 2008. 224–230, 331–338
      8. De verbi incarnatione

        • Bažil, Martin. Centones christiani: métamorphoses d'une forme intertextuelle dans la poésie latine chrétienne de l'Antiquité tardive. Collection des études augustiniennes. Série Moyen Age et temps moderns 47. Paris: Institut d'études augustiniennes, 2008. 218–223, 323–329
        • Giampiccolo, E. Osservazioni primi sul centone virgiliano De Verbi incarnatione. Sileno 33 (2007), 53–68.
      9. Thierry of St. Trond

    2. Virgilian Parody

      1. Early Detractors

      2. Cornificius Gallus

      3. Servius

    3. Eclogues 4

      • Wifstrand Schiebe, Marianne. Virgilius de uno deo aperte loquitur. Eklogendeutung und Laktanzanlehnung bei Hugo de Folieto (12. Jahrhundert). In: Von Homer bis Landino: Beiträge zur Antike und Spätantike sowie zu deren Rezeptions- und Wirkungsgeschichte; Festgabe für Antonie Wlosok zum 80. Geburtstag. Edited by Beate Regina Suchla. Berlin: Pro Business, 2011.
        This article deals with a Christian adaptation (or usurpation) of Eclogues that is unusual for not being restricted to Eclogues 4 and 5.
      1. Lactantius

        • Lactantius, De mortibus persecutorum, is full of Virgil: see J. N. Adams, Five Notes on Lactantius, 'De Mortibus Persecutorum,' Antichthon 23 (1989): 92–98.
      2. Constantine I

      3. Augustine

      4. Jerome

      5. Christian of Stavelot

      6. Peter Abelard

      7. Jean de Meun

      8. Dante

    4. Orpheus

      1. Ovid

      2. Martial

      3. Boethius

        • At lines 50–51 Tester, whose translation is quoted, errs by construing what must be occĭdit as if it were occīdit: the translation should read not Orpheus his Eurydice saw, lost, and killed, but Orpheus saw his Eurydice, lost her, and dies. For identification of the error and implications of the proper construe, see:
          Dronke, Peter. Imágenes mitológicas en la poesía de Boecio. In Poesía latina medieval (siglos V-XV). Actas del IV Congreso del «Internationales Mittellateinerkomitee» (Santiago de Compostela, 12–15 de septiembre de 2002). Ed. Manuel C. Díaz y Díaz and José M. Díaz de Bustamante. Millennio Medievale 55. Atti di Convegni 17. Florence: SISMEL, 2005. 33–45, at 35–36.
      4. Fulgentius

      5. (Pseudo-) Bernardo Sivestris

    5. Dido

      1. Ovid

      2. Tertullian

      3. Bobbio Epigrams

      4. Macrobius

      5. Jerome

      6. Augustine

      7. O decus, O Libye regnum

      8. Anna soror ut quid mori

      9. Dante

      10. Petrarch

      11. Boccaccio

      12. Chaucer

        • Kuczynski, Michael P. Gower's Virgil. In On John Gower: Essays at the Millennium. Ed. R. F. Yeager. Kalamazoo: Medieval Institute Publications, 2007. 161–187.
    6. Descent into the Underworld

      1. Servius

      2. (Pseudo-) Bernardo Silvestris

    7. Golden Bough

      1. Macrobius

      2. Servius

      3. (Pseudo-) Bernardo Silvestris

      4. John of Salisbury

    8. Florilegia

    9. Roman d'Énéas

      1. Dido

      2. Golden Bough

    10. Heinrich von Veldeke

      • Schmitz, Silvia. Die Poetik der Adaptation: literarische inventio im Eneas Heinrichs von Veldeke. Hermaea 113. (Habilitation, Technische Universität, Berlin, 1994.) Tübingen: Niemeyer, 2007.
      1. Dido

      2. Descent into the Underworld

    11. Middle Irish Wanderings of Aeneas

      • Poppe, Erich. Imtheachta Aeniasa: Virgil's Aeneid in Medieval Ireland. Classics Ireland 11 (2004), 74–94.
      1. Historical Prologue

      2. Dido

      3. Golden Bough

    12. Virgil in Medieval Icelandic

      For additional information on Virgil in medieval Icelandic literature, see:
      • Magerøy, Hallvard. Vergil-påverknad på norrøn litteratur. Gripla 10 (1998) 75–136.
      • Würth, Stefanie. Der Antikenroman in der isländischen Literatur des Mittelalters: eine Untersuchung zur Übersetzung und Rezeption lateinischer Literatur im Norden. Basel: Helbing & Lichtenhahn, 1998.
      1. Trojan horse

        • The bracketed note on the altar that was consecrated to Thor is incorrect. Thor is substituted not for Jupiter but instead for the Penates.
      2. Serpentine Simile

      3. Trojan Horse (Rationalized)

      4. Thor Substituted for Jupiter

  4. Commentary tradition

    1. Tradition of Commentary before the Fourth Century

      1. Quintus Caecilius Epirota

      2. Gaius Iulius Hyginus

      3. Quintus Asconius Pedianus

      4. Lucius Annaeus Cornutus

      5. Marcus Valerius Probus

      6. Velius

      7. Aulus Gellius

      8. Aemilius Asper

    2. Servius

      1. Comment on Aeneid 4

        • Monno, Olga. Didone casta/amatrix nell'esegesi di Servio. Maia 59 (2007), 447–459.
      2. Allegory

    3. Macrobius

      1. Rhetorical Devices

      2. Oratorical Skill

      3. Greek Models

      4. Roman Models

      5. Knowledge of Astronomy and Philosophy

      6. Pontifical Law

      7. Augural Law

    4. Other Commentators of the Fourth or Fifth Century

      1. Iunius Philargyrius

      2. Aelius Donatus

      3. Tiberius Claudius Donatus

        • Pirovano, Luigi. Le interpretationes vergilianae di Tiberio Claudio Donato: problemi di retorica. Studi e testi tardoantichi 5. Rome: Herder, 2006.
    5. Priscian

    6. Fulgentius

      • Wolff, Etienne. Vergil and Fulgentius. Vergilius 54 (2008), 59–69.
    7. Virgilius Maro Grammaticus

    8. Scholia Bernensia on Eclogues 4

    9. Old Irish Glosses on Philargyrius

      1. Comment on Eclogues 419

      2. Comment on Eclogues 428

      3. Comment on Eclogues 434

      4. Comment on Eclogues 440

      5. Comment on Eclogues 442

      6. Comment on Eclogues 444

      7. Comment on Eclogues 445

      8. Comment on Eclogues 450

    10. Carolingian Commentary on Eclogues 6

    11. Carolingian Glosses on the Aeneid

    12. Old High German Glosses

    13. Introduction to the Latin homer

    14. Introduction to the Eclogues

      1. Argumenta

      2. Accessus

    15. "Master Anselm"

    16. Platonizing Directions in Virgilian Allegory

      1. Opening Notes

      2. Glosses on the Aeneid

    17. (Pseudo-) Bernardus Silvestris

      1. Preface to Commentary on Aeneid

      2. Comment on Aeneid 1.52

      3. Comment on Aeneid 1.412, 456

      4. Comment on Aeneid 2.1

      5. Comment on Aeneid 3

      6. Comment on Aeneid 4

      7. Comment on Aeneid 5.1, 114

      8. Comment on Aeneid 6.6

      9. Comment on Aeneid 6.13,34

      10. Comment on Aeneid 6.42

      11. Comment on Aeneid 6.455

      12. Introduction to Martianus Capella 2.70–86, 93–104, 114–24

    18. Conrad of Hirsau

    19. John of Garland

      1. Parisiana poetria 1.124–34

      2. Parisiana poetria 1.394–405

      3. Parisiana poetria 2.87–123

    20. Nicholas Trevet

    21. Aeneid Commentary of Mixed Type

      1. Opening of Book 6

      2. Orpheus and Eurydice

      3. Golden Bough

    22. Cristoforo Landino

      1. Introduction on the Nature of Poetry

      2. On Allegorical Interpretation

      3. Dido and Aeneas

      4. Golden Bough

    23. Virgilian Obscenity

      1. Quintillian

      2. Aulus Gellius

      3. Ausonius

      4. Diomedes

      5. Marius Plotius Sacerdos

      6. Macrobius

      7. Servius

    24. Allegorical Topoi

      1. Evolution of Civilization

      2. Vita contemplativa, voluptuosa, and activa

      3. Development of a Human Life

      4. Physics and Philosophy

      5. Eclogues 1–3 and the Three Natural Lives

  5. Virgilian Legends

    1. Virgil the Magician

      1. Sortes Vergilianae

      2. John of Salisbury

      3. John of Alta Silva

      4. Conrad of Querfurt

      5. Gervase of Tilbury

      6. Alexander Neckam

      7. Wolfram von Eschenbach

      8. Perlesvaus

      9. Dante

      10. Johannes Gobi Junior

      11. Boccaccio

    2. Magic Figurines and Statues

      1. Apocalypsis Goliae

      2. Cino da Pistoia

      3. On the Perfection of Life

      4. Salvation of Rome

      5. Huguccio of Pisa

      6. About a Statue at Rome

    3. Virgil in the Basket and Virgil's Revenge

      1. Guiraut de Calanson

      2. Deeds of the Romans

      3. Juan Ruiz

      4. Giovanni Sercambi

      5. Virgilessrímur

      6. Aeneas Silvius Piccolomini

      7. Virgil and Ovid as Rivals

    4. Visions Involving Virgil

      1. Anonymous of Ferrières

      2. John of Salerno

        • This passage is quoted in Helen Waddell, The Wandering Scholars (London: Constable, 1927), p. 87. She also quotes Maiolus of Cluny as saying: Sufficient unto you are the divine poets; nor have you any need to pollute yourself with the luxurious eloquence of Virgil.
      3. Rodulfus Glaber

      4. Everhelm (and Onulf)

      5. Hildebert of Lavardin

      6. Vision of Virgil in Hell

      7. Georgian Passion of St. Panosophios of Alexandria

    5. Virgil in Preaching

      1. Exemplum Invoking Virgil

      2. John Lathbury

    6. Fusion of Lives and Legends

      1. Vincent of Beauvais

      2. John of Wales

      3. Conrad of Mure

      4. (Pseudo-) Walter Burley

    7. Alexander of Telese

      1. On Aeneas' Founding and Virgil's Lordship of Naples

      2. Address to King Roger

    8. Image du monde

      1. First Redaction

      2. Second Redaction

    9. Jans Enikel

    10. Adenet le Roi

    11. Oracle of the Three Letters

      1. Marvels of Virgil

      2. Tales of the Carthaginians

    12. Noirons li Arabis

    13. Renart le Contrefait

      1. Virgil's Wonders and Virgil in the Basket

      2. Virgil's Revenge

    14. Cronaca di Partenope

    15. Antonio Pucci

    16. Jean d'Outremeuse

    17. Virgil's Journey to the Magnetic Mountain

    18. Bonamente Aliprandi

    19. Baena Songbook

      • Only a few decades before the Baena Songbook was compiled, Enrique de Villena (died 1434), a writer of Aragonese extraction, was commissioned in 1427 by King Juan II of Castile to produce a vernacular translation of the Aeneid. Villena divided the poem and its gloss into 366 chapters, one for each day of the year. Villena's text is divided into three parts. The Prohemio is indebted to the traditions of the accessus and vita. This introductory material is followed by the prose translation of the Aeneid itself, which in turn is accompanied by extensive marginal comments (extant for only books 1–3). See Gilbert-Santamaría, Donald. Historicizing Vergil: Translation and Exegesis in Enrique de Villena's Eneida, Hispanic Review 73 (2005), 409–430.
      1. No. 38

      2. No. 226

      3. No. 227

      4. No. 533

      5. No. 377

    20. Gutierre Díaz de Games

    21. Life of Virgil

      • De tovenaar Vergilius: een tekstuitgave van Virgilius; van zijn leven, doot ende van den wonderlijcken wercken die hi dede by nigromancien ende by dat behulpe des duvels, Antwerpen, Willem Vorsterman, circa 1525. Peter J. A. Franssen. Middelnederlandse tekstedities 12. Hilversum: Verloren, 2010. This volume offers an edition of the Dutch work on which the English is based.
      • Franssen, Peter J. A., and Bettina Hartlieb. De andere Virgilius of hoogmoed komt voor de val. De nieuwe taalgids 88 (1995), 223–235.
      • Franssen, Peter J. A., and Bettina Hartlieb. Is de prozatekst over Virgilius de tovenaar oorspronkelijk in het Nederlands geschreven? Spektator 23 (1994), 3–21. This article presents arguments to support the view that the original version of the Virgilius was written in Dutch and not French.
    22. "Olde Deceyte of Virgilius"


Further Citations

If you wish to ensure the inclusion of reference to your work in this website, please send publications as email or as offprint to:

Professor Jan M. Ziolkowski
Director,
Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection
1703 32nd Street, NW
Washington, DC 20007-2961
USA